Marvellous Marvin Gaye: Five From 1983

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Marvin entered 1983 with mixed emotions. His comeback album Midnight Love, released in October 1982, was a certified hit, with decent sales, good PR and an attendant single ‘Sexual Healing’ that was building up quite a Grammy buzz.

But there were plenty of other problems brewing: in his rather paranoid state, Marvin believed that pretenders to his throne like Teddy Pendergrass, Frankie Beverly (whom Marvin had mentored early in his career) and Michael Jackson were cashing in on his style and sound. The latter had even taken to wearing aviator shades and ‘military’ garb.

Elsewhere, Marvin’s relationship with his father had hit a new low. Bitter and resentful, he considered physically ejecting Father from the family home but decided instead to stay away completely.

The other problem was cashflow. Marvin was spending so much money on ‘extras’ that he had been forced to give up his houses in Bel Air and Palm Springs.

Despite all this, in the first few months of 1983, Marvin reminded the music world of his luminous genius and, against all the odds, provided a few career high-points.

Broke and entering an introspective period, he found himself spending quite a lot of time at his sister Sweetsie’s pad. It was there, on Saturday 12th February 1983, that he got together with chief musical collaborator Gordon Banks to cook up a version of the national anthem that he would sing the next day before the National Basketball Association’s All-Star Game. Despite the last-minute planning, there was no margin for error: Marvin’s performance would be broadcast live on national TV.

He not only pulled it off – he smashed it out of the park. Only Marvin could have come up something so singular. His huge respect for the athletes ensured that he raised his game accordingly. Funky, spiritual, heartfelt and yet controversial, it was a triumphant reading of ‘The Star Spangled Banner’, and one of the highlights of his career. It still makes the hairs stand on end.

Less than two weeks later, on February 23rd, there was another personal milestone for Marvin when he was awarded his first Grammy awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. That the Best Male Vocal and Best Instrumental Performance awards were ‘only’ in the R’n’B category scarcely mattered. He had moved out from behind his Grammy nemesis Lou Rawls’ shadow and finally gained the acceptance of his peers, something that was extremely important to him. His speeches were heartfelt and touching.

His performance of ‘Sexual Healing’ was not an unqualified success (it was 10 or 15 BPMs too slow and Marvin seemed slightly uncomfortable), but it’s still essential and moving stuff.

Another very happy moment happened a few months later when Marvin appeared with Gladys Knight and the Pips on another TV special. According to David Ritz’s classic book ‘Divided Soul‘, Marvin and Gladys argued backstage about whose version of ‘I Heard It Through The Grapevine’ to do. He finally deferred to her, but still turned in another joyous and brilliant performance.

Then, on 25th March 1983, the Pasadena Civic Auditorium hosted the ‘Motown 25’ anniversary concert, most famous for Michael Jackson’s spellbinding reading of ‘Billie Jean’. Marvin once again defied expectations and provided one of the highlights of the evening.

Though looking somewhat haggard, his blues/gospel piano playing and philosophical pronouncements on the value and history of black music were nothing less than captivating. His subsequent performance of ‘What’s Going On’ was perhaps perfunctory in comparison, but still essential viewing.

Tougher, tragic times were to come over the next year, but for a few months in early 1983, Marvin was seeing a lot of his professional dreams come true. No one could take that away from him.

Kelis, Al Jarreau And ‘Blurred Lines’: Does Pharrell Have Form?

KelisSo it’s official – Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke ripped off Marvellous Marvin’s ‘Got To Give It Up‘ when they wrote ‘Blurred Lines‘ in just one hour (though Thicke denies having any input into the writing of the song).

And The Guardian reports that Pharrell’s ‘Happy‘ may now be in the Gaye family’s sights too due to its alleged similarity to ‘Ain’t That Peculiar‘.

Trumpet player, composer and blogger Nicholas Payton has written eloquently and passionately about the whys and wherefores of the ‘Blurred Lines’ case here. I won’t go into whether I think that verdict is just; suffice it to say that I dig what Mr Payton says, right down the line.

But what’s interesting is that Pharrell seems to have previous. Let’s investigate the track ‘Roller Rink’ from Kelis’s great 1999 album Kaleidoscope which, according to the credits, Pharrell co-wrote with Chad Hugo and Kelis.

Now compare that with ‘No Ordinary Love’, credited to Michael Gregory Jackson, which features on Gregory Jackson’s 1983 album Situation X and also Al Jarreau’s L Is For Lover from 1986, both produced by Nile Rodgers:

Weird. Kelis/Pharrell/Chad haven’t even bothered to change key. They’ve just ‘replayed’ Gregory Jackson’s original with a slightly different arrangement. Their version comes up with a better melody in the verses though the chorus melody just uses the catchy little synth motif from both Gregory Jackson and Jarreau versions.

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Michael Gregory Jackson circa 1983

Michael Gregory Jackson started out as a first-call guitarist in the New York avant-garde jazz scene in the mid-’70s. Later in the decade, he reinvented himself as a singer-songwriter and did a pretty job of it, his 1987 solo album What To Where getting rave reviews in Q Magazine and a few other influential rags at the time. But commercial success eluded him.

Regarding ‘Roller Rink’/’No Ordinary Love’, maybe Gregory Jackson was just easy to push over. After all, he’s jazz. Maybe they did settle out of court. But you’d think at least a songwriting credit might be in order. I wonder how much income Gregory Jackson has lost out on, even though Kaleidoscope wasn’t a huge hit album and ‘Roller Rink’ wasn’t a single.

I haven’t checked to see if subsequent versions of the CD have different credits but my 1999 Kaleidoscope CD credits state that the track was ‘written by K Rogers/P Williams/C Hugo’ with no mention of sample permissions etc. The album’s Wikipedia page says the same thing.

About eight years ago, I made some routine enquiries to Virgin Publishing but didn’t get anywhere. Anyway, it’s only music, there are only 12 notes, etc etc. But who knows what other examples are out there? I’ll be listening closely in the future to Neptunes tracks and Pharrell solo tracks, co-productions and co-writes, many of which I’m unfamiliar with at this point.